Home

What's New

Blog Post | Financial Reform

NYT Points Out Overdraft Fees Still A Problem | Ed Mierzwinski

A major article in today's New York Times, "Overdraft Practices Continue to Gut Bank Accounts and Haunt Customers," points out that while 2010 reforms put in place by the pre-CFPB regulators have helped, there's still work to be done to protect consumers from unfair overdraft practices. While years ago banks used "bounced check" fees to deter what was then seen as a negative behavior, more recently they have encouraged overdrafts by offering "standard overdraft protection" as if it is a feature, not a bug. They've made billions.

> Keep Reading
Blog Post | Public Health

Is your daily routine toxic? | Anna Low-Beer

Because of a lack of regulation, many cosmetics and personal care products contain potentially toxic ingredients, like formaldehyde and lead acetate. What toxic chemicals might you encounter as you go about your daily routine? 

> Keep Reading
Blog Post | Consumer Protection

30 Years of "Trouble in Toyland," 30 Years of Safety Improvements | Anna Low-Beer

Every year, U.S. PIRG Education Fund releases Trouble in Toyland, a report on toy safety which examines toys bought at major national retailers, looking for safety hazards including toxic toys, choking hazards, labeling violations, powerful magnets, and excessibely loud toys. We continue to find these hazards on store shelves, which indicates the need for continued vigilance and adequate enforcement of safety regulations. But despite lingering dangers, in the last 30 years, we've come a long way in terms of both policy and compliance with standards.

> Keep Reading
Blog Post | Transportation

Millennials Want More Public Transportation | Sean Doyle

A new poll shows that access to public transportation is “very important” for Millennials in considering where to live and where to work.  The results support our research over the past few years that found Millennials are driving less than older generations and are more prone to walk, bike, or take transit to get where they need to go.

> Keep Reading

Pages

News Release | MoPIRG Foundation | Transportation

New Report Shows Missourians Are Driving Less

Missourians have cut their per-person driving miles by 3.45 percent since 2005, reflecting the end of the nation’s long-term driving boom. Nationwide, the decline in driving has been even greater than in Missouri, with per-person driving miles down 6.87 percent nationwide during the same period.

> Keep Reading
News Release | MoPIRG Foundation | Budget

Missouri Receives a “C” in Annual Report on Transparency of Government Spending

Missouri received a “C” when it comes to government spending transparency, according to “Following the Money 2013: How the States Rank on Providing Online Access to Government Spending Data,” the fourth annual report of its kind by MoPIRG Foundation

> Keep Reading
Media Hit | Budget

Budget Solution is Hiding in the Caymans

Should we really cut food safety, law enforcement, and education while the nation’s largest, most profitable corporations use loopholes to avoid paying the taxes they should pay?

> Keep Reading
News Release | MoPIRG Foundation | Tax

Offshore Tax Dodging Blows a $843 Million Hole in Missouri Budget

With Missouri in the midst of a budget crisis, MoPIRG Foundation, joined by small business owners, released a new study revealing that Missouri lost $843 Million due to offshore tax dodging in 2012. Many of America’s wealthiest individuals and largest corporations, use tax loopholes to shift profits made in America to offshore tax havens, where they pay little to no taxes.

> Keep Reading
Media Hit | Budget

Kansas City's Report Card Is In

Ever wonder what goes on during a city council meeting? Or how much money was made from parking meters last year? The answers to some questions like these are available to the public online, but every city in the United States differs on how much information they share.

> Keep Reading

Pages

Report | MoPIRG | Health Care

The Cost of Repeal

Consumers and small businesses in Missouri will face significantly higher insurance premiums and could see costly coverage denials and price discrimination if efforts to repeal the federal health care law prevail in Congress or in the courts, according to The Cost of Repeal: Examining the Impact on Missouri of Repealing the New Federal Health Care Law, a new report released today by MoPIRG.

> Keep Reading
Report | U.S. PIRG | Consumer Protection

Trouble in Toyland: The 25th Annual Survey of Toy Safety

The 2010 Trouble in Toyland report is the 25th annual Public Interest Research Group (PIRG) survey of toy safety.  In this report, U.S. PIRG provides safety guidelines for consumers when purchasing toys for small children and provides examples of toys currently on store shelves that may pose potential safety hazards.

> Keep Reading

The Young Person's Guide to Health Insurance

For people in their late teens and twenties, getting health insurance can be a lot like a lottery . . .

If you’re lucky, your parents have a good plan that covers you while you are in school or your employer picks up the tab. If you’re not, your options shrink to two: a plan offering good coverage that you can’t afford, or a plan you can afford that covers little to nothing.

> Keep Reading
Report | MoPIRG | Transportation

Connecting the Midwest: How a faster passenger rail network can speed travel and boost the economy

Intercity passenger rail in the Midwest can be part of the solution. The Midwestern states have put forward a bold vision for efficient, rapid passenger rail service linking the entire region. The federal government is allocating more than $2.7 billion in funds from the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act to bring that vision closer to reality with rail projects in six Midwestern states.

> Keep Reading
Report | National Workgroup for Safe Markets | Consumer Protection

No Silver Lining: An Investigation into Bisphenol A in Canned Foods

A public health debate is raging around the world about the safety of bisphenol A (BPA). Chemical manufacturing and packaging companies claim BPA is safe and necessary to protect food from metal can corrosion and bacterial contamination.

However, scientists, health professionals, and children's and environmental health advocates are concerned that hundreds of independent peer-reviewed scientific studies have found negative health outcomes resulting from low doses of BPA.

> Keep Reading

Pages

Support us

Your tax-deductible donation supports MoPIRG Foundation’s work to educate consumers on the issues that matter, and the powerful interests that are blocking progress.

Learn More

You can also support MoPIRG Foundation’s work through bequests, contributions from life insurance or retirement plans, securities contributions and vehicle donations.